Highlighted Papers

Srivastava et al.

A systems-level framework for drug discovery identifies Csf1R as an anti-epileptic drug target

Nature Communications, Published September 3, 2018
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-06008-4 

“This provides a novel bioinformatics framework for generating specific hypotheses for new therapeutics by integrating biological and directly pharmacologically-relevant transcriptomics data.  The focus on using pharmacogenomic data related to modulation of GPCRs is intended to better ensure the medicinal chemistry tractability of targets identified.  It also allows tool compounds to be identified that might allow early proofs of principle in human experimental medicine. The demonstration of its application in epilepsy- and, indeed, the target identified- well illustrate the potential of the approach to contribute the research in late life neurodegenerative disease.”

- Professor Paul Matthews
Associate Director UK Dementia Research Institute
Imperial College London

Architecture of the Mouse Brain Synaptome

Neuron, Published August 02, 2018
https://www.cell.com/neuron/fulltext/S0896-6273(18)30581-6

"One of the greatest challenges for studies of neurodegenerative disease is to understand how the functional connectional architecture of the brain changes with loss or damage to neurons; expression of disease depends as much on what is preserved and how it works as it does on what is loss.  This paper provides the most comprehensive description of the connectional architecture of the mouse brain to date.  It provides proofs of concept for developing similar maps with disease models that highlight how the architecture changes.  Moreover, it is scalable enough to allow studies with drugs and other interventions.  I was delighted that one of our UK DRI scientists, Maksym Kopanitsa, was able to contribute to the work of this exceptional team!"

- Professor Paul Matthews
Associate Director UK Dementia Research Institute
Imperial College London

A Prospective Metagenomic and Metabolomic Analysis of the Impact of Exercise and/or Whey Protein Supplementation on the Gut Microbiome of Sedentary Adults

mSystems. eCollection 2018 May-Jun.
https://msystems.asm.org/content/3/3/e00044-18 

"A sedentary lifestyle contributes to risks of sporadic onset, late life Alzheimer's disease.  The recent FINGER Trial run by Miia Kivipelto, who divides her time between the Karolinska Institute and Imperial, provides direct evidence that a regular programme of exercise as part of a multi domain intervention reduces risks of later cogntived decline (PMID:29055814).  This report provides a first prospective analysis of the microbiome with exercise interventions, a key step towards elucidating the potential contribution of the microbiome to slowing cognitive decline with ageing."

- Professor Paul Matthews
Associate Director UK Dementia Research Institute
Imperial College London


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