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  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Zhong Q, Fan X, Luo X, Toni Fet al., 2019,

    An explainable multi-attribute decision model based on argumentation

    , Expert Systems with Applications, Vol: 117, Pages: 42-61, ISSN: 0957-4174

    © 2018 Elsevier Ltd We present a multi-attribute decision model and a method for explaining the decisions it recommends based on an argumentative reformulation of the model. Specifically, (i) we define a notion of best (i.e., minimally redundant) decisions amounting to achieving as many goals as possible and exhibiting as few redundant attributes as possible, and (ii) we generate explanations for why a decision is best or better than or as good as another, using a mapping between the given decision model and an argumentation framework, such that best decisions correspond to admissible sets of arguments. Concretely, natural language explanations are generated automatically from dispute trees sanctioning the admissibility of arguments. Throughout, we illustrate the power of our approach within a legal reasoning setting, where best decisions amount to past cases that are most similar to a given new, open case. Finally, we conduct an empirical evaluation of our method with legal practitioners, confirming that our method is effective for the choice of most similar past cases and helpful to understand automatically generated recommendations.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Alrajeh D, Russo A, 2018,

    Logic-based learning: Theory and application

    , Pages: 219-256, ISSN: 0302-9743

    © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018. In recent years, research efforts have been directed towards the use of Machine Learning (ML) techniques to support and automate activities such as specification mining, risk assessment, program analysis, and program repair. The focus has largely been on the use of machine learning black box methods whose inference mechanisms are not easily interpretable and whose outputs are not declarative and guaranteed to be correct. Hence, they cannot readily be used to inform the elaboration and revision of declarative software models identified to be incorrect or incomplete. On the other hand, recent advances in ML have witnessed the emergence of new logic-based machine learning approaches that overcome such limitations and which have been proven to be well-suited for many software engineering tasks. In this chapter, we present a survey of the state-of-the-art of logic-based machine learning techniques, highlight their expressivity, define their different underlying semantics, and discuss their efficiency and the heuristics they adopt to guide the search for solutions. We then demonstrate the application of this type of machine learning to (declarative) specification refinement and revision as a complementary task to program analysis.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Altuncu MT, Mayer E, Yaliraki SN, Barahona Met al., 2018,

    From Text to Topics in Healthcare Records: An Unsupervised Graph Partitioning Methodology

    Electronic Healthcare Records contain large volumes of unstructured data,including extensive free text. Yet this source of detailed information oftenremains under-used because of a lack of methodologies to extract interpretablecontent in a timely manner. Here we apply network-theoretical tools to analysefree text in Hospital Patient Incident reports from the National HealthService, to find clusters of documents with similar content in an unsupervisedmanner at different levels of resolution. We combine deep neural networkparagraph vector text-embedding with multiscale Markov Stability communitydetection applied to a sparsified similarity graph of document vectors, andshowcase the approach on incident reports from Imperial College Healthcare NHSTrust, London. The multiscale community structure reveals different levels ofmeaning in the topics of the dataset, as shown by descriptive terms extractedfrom the clusters of records. We also compare a posteriori against hand-codedcategories assigned by healthcare personnel, and show that our approachoutperforms LDA-based models. Our content clusters exhibit good correspondencewith two levels of hand-coded categories, yet they also provide further medicaldetail in certain areas and reveal complementary descriptors of incidentsbeyond the external classification taxonomy.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Altuncu MT, Yaliraki SN, Barahona M, 2018,

    Content-driven, unsupervised clustering of news articles through multiscale graph partitioning

    , KDD 2018 - Workshop on Data Science Journalism & Media (DSJM)

    The explosion in the amount of news and journalistic content being generatedacross the globe, coupled with extended and instantaneous access to informationthrough online media, makes it difficult and time-consuming to monitor newsdevelopments and opinion formation in real time. There is an increasing needfor tools that can pre-process, analyse and classify raw text to extractinterpretable content; specifically, identifying topics and content-drivengroupings of articles. We present here such a methodology that brings togetherpowerful vector embeddings from Natural Language Processing with tools fromGraph Theory that exploit diffusive dynamics on graphs to reveal naturalpartitions across scales. Our framework uses a recent deep neural network textanalysis methodology (Doc2vec) to represent text in vector form and thenapplies a multi-scale community detection method (Markov Stability) topartition a similarity graph of document vectors. The method allows us toobtain clusters of documents with similar content, at different levels ofresolution, in an unsupervised manner. We showcase our approach with theanalysis of a corpus of 9,000 news articles published by Vox Media over oneyear. Our results show consistent groupings of documents according to contentwithout a priori assumptions about the number or type of clusters to be found.The multilevel clustering reveals a quasi-hierarchy of topics and subtopicswith increased intelligibility and improved topic coherence as compared toexternal taxonomy services and standard topic detection methods.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Baroni P, Rago A, Toni F, 2018,

    How Many Properties Do We Need for Gradual Argumentation?

    , Publisher: AAAI Press, Pages: 1736-1743
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Biffi C, de Marvao A, Attard MI, Dawes TJW, Whiffin N, Bai W, Shi W, Francis C, Meyer H, Buchan R, Cook SA, Rueckert D, O'Regan DPet al., 2018,

    Three-dimensional cardiovascular imaging-genetics: a mass univariate framework

    , BIOINFORMATICS, Vol: 34, Pages: 97-103, ISSN: 1367-4803
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Chamberlain B, Levy-Kramer J, Humby C, Deisenroth MPet al., 2018,

    Real-time community detection in full social networks on a laptop

    , PLoS ONE, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1932-6203

    For a broad range of research and practical applications it is important to understand the allegiances, communities and structure of key players in society. One promising direction towards extracting this information is to exploit the rich relational data in digital social networks (the social graph). As global social networks (e.g., Facebook and Twitter) are very large, most approaches make use of distributed computing systems for this purpose. Distributing graph processing requires solving many difficult engineering problems, which has lead some researchers to look at single-machine solutions that are faster and easier to maintain. In this article, we present an approach for analyzing full social networks on a standard laptop, allowing for interactive exploration of the communities in the locality of a set of user specified query vertices. The key idea is that the aggregate actions of large numbers of users can be compressed into a data structure that encapsulates the edge weights between vertices in a derived graph. Local communities can be constructed by selecting vertices that are connected to the query vertices with high edge weights in the derived graph. This compression is robust to noise and allows for interactive queries of local communities in real-time, which we define to be less than the average human reaction time of 0.25s. We achieve single-machine real-time performance by compressing the neighborhood of each vertex using minhash signatures and facilitate rapid queries through Locality Sensitive Hashing. These techniques reduce query times from hours using industrial desktop machines operating on the full graph to milliseconds on standard laptops. Our method allows exploration of strongly associated regions (i.e., communities) of large graphs in real-time on a laptop. It has been deployed in software that is actively used by social network analysts and offers another channel for media owners to monetize their data, helping them to continue to provide

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Clarke J, Warren L, Darzi A, Barahona Met al., 2018,

    Guiding Interoperable Electronic Health Records Through Patient Sharing Networks

    , NPJ Digital Medicine
  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Cocarascu O, Cyras K, Toni F, 2018,

    Explanatory predictions with artificial neural networks and argumentation

    , Workshop on Explainable Artificial Intelligence (XAI)

    Data-centric AI has proven successful in severaldomains, but its outputs are often hard to explain.We present an architecture combining ArtificialNeural Networks (ANNs) for feature selection andan instance of Abstract Argumentation (AA) forreasoning to provide effective predictions, explain-able both dialectically and logically. In particular,we train an autoencoder to rank features in input ex-amples, and select highest-ranked features to gen-erate an AA framework that can be used for mak-ing and explaining predictions as well as mappedonto logical rules, which can equivalently be usedfor making predictions and for explaining.Weshow empirically that our method significantly out-performs ANNs and a decision-tree-based methodfrom which logical rules can also be extracted.

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Cocarascu O, Toni F, 2018,

    Combining deep learning and argumentative reasoning for the analysis of social media textual content using small datasets

    , Computational Linguistics, ISSN: 0891-2017

    The use of social media has become a regular habit for many and has changed the way people interact with each other. In this article, we focus on analysing whether news headlines support tweets and whether reviews are deceptive by analysing the interaction or the influence that these texts have on the others, thus exploiting contextual information. Concretely, we define a deep learning method for Relation-based Argument Mining to extract argumentative relations of attack and support. We then use this method for determining whether news articles support tweets, a useful task in fact-checking settings, where determining agreement towards a statement is a useful step towards determining its truthfulness. Furthermore we use our method for extracting Bipolar Argumentation Frameworks from reviews to help detect whether they are deceptive. We show experimentally that our method performs well in both settings. In particular, in the case of deception detection, our method contributes a novel argumentative feature that, when used in combination with other features in standard supervised classifiers, outperforms the latter even on small datasets.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Dutordoir V, Salimbeni H, Deisenroth M, Hensman Jet al., 2018,

    Gaussian Process Conditional Density Estimation

    Conditional Density Estimation (CDE) models deal with estimating conditionaldistributions. The conditions imposed on the distribution are the inputs of themodel. CDE is a challenging task as there is a fundamental trade-off betweenmodel complexity, representational capacity and overfitting. In this work, wepropose to extend the model's input with latent variables and use Gaussianprocesses (GP) to map this augmented input onto samples from the conditionaldistribution. Our Bayesian approach allows for the modeling of small datasets,but we also provide the machinery for it to be applied to big data usingstochastic variational inference. Our approach can be used to model densitieseven in sparse data regions, and allows for sharing learned structure betweenconditions. We illustrate the effectiveness and wide-reaching applicability ofour model on a variety of real-world problems, such as spatio-temporal densityestimation of taxi drop-offs, non-Gaussian noise modeling, and few-shotlearning on omniglot images.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Kamthe S, Deisenroth MP, 2018,

    Data-Efficient Reinforcement Learning with Probabilistic Model Predictive Control.

    , Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, Publisher: PMLR, Pages: 1701-1710
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Kormushev P, Ugurlu B, Caldwell DG, Tsagarakis NGet al., 2018,

    Learning to exploit passive compliance for energy-efficient gait generation on a compliant humanoid

    , Autonomous Robots, Pages: 1-17, ISSN: 0929-5593

    © 2018 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature Modern humanoid robots include not only active compliance but also passive compliance. Apart from improved safety and dependability, availability of passive elements, such as springs, opens up new possibilities for improving the energy efficiency. With this in mind, this paper addresses the challenging open problem of exploiting the passive compliance for the purpose of energy efficient humanoid walking. To this end, we develop a method comprising two parts: an optimization part that finds an optimal vertical center-of-mass trajectory, and a walking pattern generator part that uses this trajectory to produce a dynamically-balanced gait. For the optimization part, we propose a reinforcement learning approach that dynamically evolves the policy parametrization during the learning process. By gradually increasing the representational power of the policy parametrization, it manages to find better policies in a faster and computationally efficient way. For the walking generator part, we develop a variable-center-of-mass-height ZMP-based bipedal walking pattern generator. The method is tested in real-world experiments with the bipedal robot COMAN and achieves a significant 18% reduction in the electric energy consumption by learning to efficiently use the passive compliance of the robot.

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Law M, Russo A, Broda K, 2018,

    The complexity and generality of learning answer set programs

    , ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, Vol: 259, Pages: 110-146, ISSN: 0004-3702
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Muggleton S, Dai WZ, Sammut C, Tamaddoni-Nezhad A, Wen J, Zhou ZHet al., 2018,

    Meta-Interpretive Learning from noisy images

    , Machine Learning, Vol: 107, Pages: 1097-1118, ISSN: 0885-6125

    Statistical machine learning is widely used in image classification. However, most techniques (1) require many images to achieve high accuracy and (2) do not provide support for reasoning below the level of classification, and so are unable to support secondary reasoning, such as the existence and position of light sources and other objects outside the image. This paper describes an Inductive Logic Programming approach called Logical Vision which overcomes some of these limitations. LV uses Meta-Interpretive Learning (MIL) combined with low-level extraction of high-contrast points sampled from the image to learn recursive logic programs describing the image. In published work LV was demonstrated capable of high-accuracy prediction of classes such as regular polygon from small numbers of images where Support Vector Machines and Convolutional Neural Networks gave near random predictions in some cases. LV has so far only been applied to noise-free, artificially generated images. This paper extends LV by (a) addressing classification noise using a new noise-telerant version of the MIL system Metagol, (b) addressing attribute noise using primitive-level statistical estimators to identify sub-objects in real images, (c) using a wider class of background models representing classical 2D shapes such as circles and ellipses, (d) providing richer learnable background knowledge in the form of a simple but generic recursive theory of light reflection. In our experiments we consider noisy images in both natural science settings and in a RoboCup competition setting. The natural science settings involve identification of the position of the light source in telescopic and microscopic images, while the RoboCup setting involves identification of the position of the ball. Our results indicate that with real images the new noise-robust version of LV using a single example (i.e. one-shot LV) converges to an accuracy at least comparable to a thirty-shot statistical machine learner on bot

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Olofsson S, Deisenroth MP, Misener R, 2018,

    Design of Experiments for Model Discrimination Hybridising Analytical and Data-Driven Approaches.

    , Publisher: JMLR.org, Pages: 3905-3914
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Olofsson S, Deisenroth MP, Misener R, 2018,

    Design of Experiments for Model Discrimination using Gaussian Process Surrogate Models

    , Vol: 44, Pages: 847-852, ISSN: 1570-7946

    © 2018 Elsevier B.V. Given rival mathematical models and an initial experimental data set, optimal design of experiments for model discrimination discards inaccurate models. Model discrimination is fundamentally about finding out how systems work. Not knowing how a particular system works, or having several rivalling models to predict the behaviour of the system, makes controlling and optimising the system more difficult. The most common way to perform model discrimination is by maximising the pairwise squared difference between model predictions, weighted by measurement noise and model uncertainty resulting from uncertainty in the fitted model parameters. The model uncertainty for analytical model functions is computed using gradient information. We develop a novel method where we replace the black-box models with Gaussian process surrogate models. Using the surrogate models, we are able to approximately marginalise out the model parameters, yielding the model uncertainty. Results show the surrogate model method working for model discrimination for classical test instances.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Pardo F, Tavakoli A, Levdik V, Kormushev Pet al., 2018,

    Time limits in reinforcement learning

    , International Conference on Machine Learning, Pages: 4042-4051

    In reinforcement learning, it is common to let anagent interact for a fixed amount of time with itsenvironment before resetting it and repeating theprocess in a series of episodes. The task that theagent has to learn can either be to maximize itsperformance over (i) that fixed period, or (ii) anindefinite period where time limits are only usedduring training to diversify experience. In thispaper, we provide a formal account for how timelimits could effectively be handled in each of thetwo cases and explain why not doing so can causestate-aliasing and invalidation of experience re-play, leading to suboptimal policies and traininginstability. In case (i), we argue that the termi-nations due to time limits are in fact part of theenvironment, and thus a notion of the remainingtime should be included as part of the agent’s in-put to avoid violation of the Markov property. Incase (ii), the time limits are not part of the envi-ronment and are only used to facilitate learning.We argue that this insight should be incorporatedby bootstrapping from the value of the state atthe end of each partial episode. For both cases,we illustrate empirically the significance of ourconsiderations in improving the performance andstability of existing reinforcement learning algo-rithms, showing state-of-the-art results on severalcontrol tasks.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Rago A, Cocarascu O, Toni F, 2018,

    Argumentation-based recommendations: Fantastic explanations and how to find them

    , Pages: 1949-1955, ISSN: 1045-0823

    © 2018 International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence. All right reserved. A significant problem of recommender systems is their inability to explain recommendations, resulting in turn in ineffective feedback from users and the inability to adapt to users' preferences. We propose a hybrid method for calculating predicted ratings, built upon an item/aspect-based graph with users' partially given ratings, that can be naturally used to provide explanations for recommendations, extracted from user-tailored Tripolar Argumentation Frameworks (TFs). We show that our method can be understood as a gradual semantics for TFs, exhibiting a desirable, albeit weak, property of balance. We also show experimentally that our method is competitive in generating correct predictions, compared with state-of-the-art methods, and illustrate how users can interact with the generated explanations to improve quality of recommendations.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Sæmundsson S, Hofmann K, Deisenroth MP, 2018,

    Meta reinforcement learning with latent variable Gaussian processes

    , Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI) 2018, Publisher: Association for Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (AUAI)

    Learning from small data sets is critical inmany practical applications where data col-lection is time consuming or expensive, e.g.,robotics, animal experiments or drug design.Meta learning is one way to increase the dataefficiency of learning algorithms by general-izing learned concepts from a set of trainingtasks to unseen, but related, tasks. Often, thisrelationship between tasks is hard coded or re-lies in some other way on human expertise.In this paper, we frame meta learning as a hi-erarchical latent variable model and infer therelationship between tasks automatically fromdata. We apply our framework in a model-based reinforcement learning setting and showthat our meta-learning model effectively gen-eralizes to novel tasks by identifying how newtasks relate to prior ones from minimal data.This results in up to a60%reduction in theaverage interaction time needed to solve taskscompared to strong baselines.

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